Seán O’Connell
Seán O’Connell
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Kate O’Connell Who is in this photo and where is it taken?
Jo O’Connell My guess, Given that it is Aunty Elly second from left, it is probably Bert Brown on left. I cant tell who the next lady in the shadows is then Poppa Jim, Grandma, FJ, Tony, Theresa, Uncle Kieran and Aunty Mary.
Anne Maree McCombie Unknown man, then Ellie and then Aunty Anne - I bet this was taken the same day as the photo with Anne, Tony and Ellie that is in Sean’s photo collection as the 3 of them are dressed in same clothes.
Jo O’Connell Your evidence is compelling. definitely Aunty Anne.
Anne Maree McCombie I don’t think it is Bert - I am leaning more to Uncle Ned - It then comes down to the children - Jimmy is the eldest grandchild - except the older child in this photo is a girl so are all the children Kieran and Mary’s? Does Kathleen know?
Anne Maree McCombie What about Uncle Mick? While this mans shoes are shinning he doesn’t seem to be wearing a suit coat. Maybe it has to do with Tony coming home from one of his trips? Lets see what the others think.
Rosie O’Brien Kath and John are in the front, maybe that’s Marie being carried and Dad with Dick.
Seán O’Connell
Seán O’Connell
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Seán O’Connell Aunty Ceil, Aunty Letty, Aunty Evelyn, Aunty Teresa, Uncle Mick Heffernan. Ellen sitting.
Alison O’Connell Aunty Ann is in the front between Evelyn and Teresa. Two of the young girls look like Margaret and Dianne Hamilton. Could be Grattan as well.
Kate O’Connell Grandma the trendsetter.
Seán O’Connell
Seán O’Connell
Ned O’Connell, son of James and Ellen.
Macraes Cricket Team 1920’s
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Maurice Prendergast Are you sure about the date? A Jim Kibblewhite taught me right through my Hyde primary schooling - prob 1944/1952. I think that’s him on right of middle row, but he would not have been around in late 20’s. Kibblewhite an unusual name, but maybe there was an earlier J. Kibblewhite. What say you?
Seán O’Connell The Hyde School Centennial book has an E. Kibblewhite listed as teacher in 1948. Paperspast has a Kibblewhite passing the Teachers Certificate in 1920.
Wendy O’Connell J.T. Kibblewhite taught at Macraes School-1923-1924.....Ted Kibblewhite was headmaster at Palmerston District High School 1961-66(possibly E. Kibblewhite, Edward=Ted)
Jo O’Connell Ted was son of Jim Kibblewhite . Ted retired to Timaru and then went to Oamaru and died a couple of years ago.
Maurice Prendergast Apologies guys - I was wrong again. You are both absolutely right. It was Jim Kibblewhite’s son Ted who taught me. I owe him much in terms of the basiic principles of literacy. The grounding that he gave me has served me well in life. I didn’t know that he migrated to Palmerston.
Alison O’Connell Ted Kibblewhite, wife and two children were our neighbours when I was growing up in Timaru. Small world!
Seán O’Connell
Seán O’Connell
Michelle and Anne Maree (‘A M’ not ‘O M’) daughters of F.J. and Evelyn O’Connell.
Macraes 1963
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Maurice Prendergast Those Hammond kids eh! How many of you remember their father Alan (Chick) Hammond? He was a bit of a gangster. Worked on the Rabbit Board. It pre-dated ACC but the Rabbit Board workers were covered by what was known as ‘Workers’ Compensation’ Chick Hammond needed a car, so he put his thumb over the end of his gun barrel and blew his thumb off. He bought a Ford Model A ‘roadster’ with the money he got for his thumb from Workers’ Compensation. I remember him and a fellow Joyce (who had a withered arm) having a fight at our shearing quarters one night. A betting man would have bet on the man with two arms, but Hammond took a swing at Joyce; missed and hit a post and broke his hand. Hammond with broken hand; couldn’t make a fist with his other hand because his thumb was missing, so the upshot was that the man with only one arm won the fight. It is true that sometimes facts are stranger than fiction.
Joe O’Connell We knew him as Hank, and he had a party down at his house on the Hyde side of the township. Dorothy Cleveland who lived in the next house down towards the cemetery was there and Hank brought around a plate of finger foods. She said “these are beautiful Hank, what are they? ”Mountain Oysters he said. “Mountain Oysters Hank? what are they...” He told her......... she power chucked...... was the talk of town for a while.
Seán O’Connell
Seán O’Connell
Macraes, early 1910’s.
Outside Griffin’s Store.
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Seán O’Connell The caption for this picture is: Aprox. 1910-1915, W. Griffin, Betty Phelan, J. Eggers, Peggie Phelan, W. Peddie, C. E. Griffin, Geo. Griffin and Joan Griffin. The problem is Betty wasn’t born until 1917. Peggie or Margaret was born 1911 so she fits but the other girl is more likely to be Patricia Phelan, born 1912. These were the daughters of Andrew and Molly (ni Claffy) Phelan.
Maurice Prendergast Was this Patricia Phelan who married Jack Kinney of Hyde. She had a beautiful soprano voice. She and Isobel Ramsay often sang duets at social gatherings. Isobel Ramsay wrote a very interesting book about the migrants who settled the district and the privations that they endured. Bullock wagons from Port Chalmers to Palmerston then inland to the hinterland. ‘Land of my Fathers’ is the title of that book. A great reference for anyone interested in revisiting the environment of their roots.
Denise O’Connell
Denise O’Connell
The photos are marvellous. Just wondered if it would also be appropriate for families to share their favourite family songs of the time or particluar songs of the age.
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Maurice Prendergast My childhood was saturated by Irish rebel songs. My GGF was a Fenian. The Fenians were a group committed to rid Ireland of British rule (around mid 1860’s). They were also known as the Irish Republican Brotherhood, and largely funded from American ex-pat refugee Irishmen and hopelessly outnumbered by the British occupying forces. Members were being summarily executed without trial and according to folklore, two of my GGF brothers had been executed when he fled to Australia with his surviving brother who was murdered soon after landing @ Sydney. My GGF then ‘legged it’ to Hyde NZ where he lived an unmolested life. But as a consequence my childhood was immersed in a despite for the Brits and a melancholy fervour for the ‘Irish martyrs’ So my childhood was dominated by Irish rebel songs like Kevin Barry and The Wild Colonial Boy. Kevin Barry was a martyr who emerged from a later era during the Irish uprising of the 1920’s. The Brits were so paranoid about the ‘hero/cult status’ generated by this song that it was banned by British rule (including the British Colonies). Does anyone remember that priest Fr: Pound - had a beautiful tenor voice and never missed a chance to offer a rendition of Kevin Barry at marriages and wakes. Google the lyrics of Kevin Barry and get a feel for the mix of the melancholy & passion in which my young life was immersed.
Denise O’Connell Brilliant commentary Maurice...yes have been into Google and am now far better acquainted with the past...thankyou.
Maurice Prendergast The hauntingly sentimental ‘famine song’ The Little Old Mud Cabin, springs to mind as a song our Irish forebearers used to sing when I was a child. The song was all about the torturous decision an old couple made to intsruct their boy to“Go sell the pig and cow agrah to take you far away - for your poor parents you must leave behind. Go seek your fortune darlin’ in that land across the sea; for in Paddy’s land but poverty you’ll find” Many of these songs were indescribably sad - especially the frequent reference to the ‘wrench’ of leaving a girl behind. The Stone outside Dan Murphy’s Door was another ‘tear jerker’ where the songwriter talks of his memories of when he and ‘sister Kate, swung on the garden gate’ My childhood was punctuated by going to Mass, saying the Rosary, the men getting pissed and singing Irish songs. That was pretty much the order and pretty much the priority too
Denise O’Connell In the 1950’s the St Patrick’s Concert held in the Civic Theatre in Christchurch was a huge event for all the Catholic school puplis and families,I remember my disappointment in not being chosen to sing ‘There’s a dear little town in the old County Down!’ A beautiful memory is of my father and uncle singing Mother Machree every Christmas Day to my grandmother and my aunty decked out in Father Christmas attire. The movie “Going My Way” with Bing Crosby was a winner and my mother bought the musical score ‘An Irish Lullaby’ with all the lovely too ral lu ral lu rals-hush now don’t you cry’...which became a regular soothing melody for our children in attempting to get the wee ones to sleep! The 60’s brought me into the O’Connell domain and it’s proud ancestry. Special memories of Winifred (Maurice’s mother) and her attending Patrick O’Hagan concerts...and ‘Cottage by the Lea’ and so many more. Maurice and I shared our love for ‘Danny Boy’...which for Maurice was overtaken in later years by ‘How Great thou Art’.
Joe O’Connell The O’Connell’s may have had musical genes as witnessed by Uncle Micks family Tom and Jim who had wonderful voices and apparently Father Dan could sing, but Jim O’Connell my grandfather married Ellen Claffy who had no note of music whatsoever. My mother said that Grandma was the only woman she had ever known or heard of who never so much as hummed a tune in her life and she passed this talent to her family. So it was only when we had visitors from the wider family that the Irish songs that Maurice referred to were sung..
Maurice Prendergast You’ve got me going now with the memory of those old Irish songs. Your reference to St Patricks concerts - sadly we lived too remote for anything structured but the pub rocked with informal concert. The rebel song “The wearing of the Green” the words (inter alia) ‘the shamrock is forbid by law to grow on Irish ground’ Do you know if that was true or just an attempt to build contempt for the Brits. In the town of Kilrush) where my kin come from there’s a memorial in the viliage square to the ‘Manchester Martyrs’ The vitriol of the inscription is unbridled as it refers to those executed as being “judiciously murdered by a tyrannical government.” They were all Fenians (to which my GGF belonged). Truth is, I suspect his courage failed him - I suspect he saw the massacre coming and that’s why he legged it to Aust. He must have been ‘packing it’ coz he left his wife and four children behind. They eventually joined him in Hyde NZ seven years later - hence my existence. But back to St Patrick concerts - yes our very own Richard O’Connell (1st) died either performing at or preparing for St. Patrick’s concert (presumably Rakaia) in 1935. Though that legend is contradicted by his headstone which offers 18 March 1935 as his date of death. Yes - that Irish lullaby was beautiful. Irish songs stand apart from all other nations (except perhaps for the Welsh) The passion of their rebel sons and the soul of their love songs. I consider myself blessed to have descended from the Irish.
Denise O’Connell and I just have to mention ‘Galway Bay’ which was a special song of many sung around the piano with my mother playing, most Sunday nights. After Mass on a Sunday we would visit Dad’s parents and Grandad would play the piano and then it was singsong time variety hour! Singing was a big part of our family...even while doing the dishes! Even when Maurice was very ill in bed he would love to hear us singing in the kitchen....‘music hath charms to soothe the savage breast’ ...i feel a song coming on....
Seán O’Connell
Seán O’Connell
Margaret ni O’Brien and Ned O’Connell
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Sarah O’Connell I would love to hear some stories about Ned (my Grandad) as I never got to meet him. If anybody recalls a good tale about him please post. Thanks.
Michelle de Faoite Mum could fill you in I am sure.....he was really strict i know that much. They had to go to the first mass on a Sunday morning as anything after that was considered a mark of disrespect. I doubt if mum ever disobeyed him but i would imagine the boys would have given him a run for his money.....
Sarah O’Connell Hey Michelle thanks hun. I must be well overdue for a trip down to Chch to catch up with you all! Gosh I never knew that about him he passed away when Dad was only 16 and I guess being the youngest he may have been a easier on him by then. I hope things are going well with you guys. xo
Michelle de Faoite Another anecdote that comes to mind...Mum said he was strict but fair. When Uncle Jim came home and announced his engagement to a Maori woman, Zoe, probably back in the late 1950’s during the urbanisation of Maori - fair play to him - he said he didn’t mind in the least about that, but was she a Catholic??!! Mum has always been proud of that.
Sarah O’Connell Ha ha Michelle that is so funny! It reminds me of something Gav would have said!
Seán O’Connell
Seán O’Connell
Mick Heffernan and the Phelan girls.
Mick Heffernan and the Phelan girls.
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Maurice Prendergast These photos are priceless. I remember having a cuppa with Mick and Lettie in the lounge of their Moonlight home. There was an open fire with a ‘patterned’ ceramic tile surround, and there was an error in the ‘pattern sequence’ of the tiles (flowers I think). I was indiscreet enough to make a fleeting comment about the flaw in the pattern sequence. I was honestly only trying to make idle conversation and had no idea Mick had tiled that fire himself. He was aware of his mistake but in something like 30 years nobody had ever noticed it. I can still see the stunned look on his face, like a cat that had just stood on the hot stove. I think what hurt him most is that Lettie was present, and I suspect his pride had never allowed him to admit his mistake. For 30 years nobody had noticed until this ‘persona non grata’ arrived on the scene and was indelicate enough to ‘gob on’ about it in front of his wife. I’d like to think that he eventually forgave me.
Seán O’Connell
Seán O’Connell
Old school pupils of Hyde.
Old school pupils.
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Maurice Prendergast My grandfather Mick Prendergast - front row second from left. Now I can understand why I’m so good looking!! He died 20 May 1939 - four days prior to my birth.
Dennis Prendergast The “M Prendergast” seated second from the left is “Michael”. He married Ellen Annett in the first wedding to be conducted in the Hyde Catholic Church in 1895, after an 8 year courtship. Ellen sadly passed away after delivering my grandfather (William) the following year (1896). Michael passed away in 1939 (4 years after this photo was taken). William went on to marry Sarah (Sadie) O’Connell which is our connection to the O’Connell clan! Great photo.. Thanks Sean.
Seán O’Connell This photo is from the Hyde Centennial booklet 1969. There is another photo in it of the original Michael Prendergast, the baker, along side his daughter Nora.
Maurice Prendergast 3rd from front left is Michael Prendergast’s sister Johanna who married Pat Kinney and started a ‘dynasty’ of outstanding musicians which endures to this day. Johanna’s GG son Steven Jaymes is musician born in Hyde and based in Sydney. He recently returned to his spiritual homeland and recorded a tribute to his roots in the old stone house at the Fillyburn (Macraes/Hyde road) Built by Jack Budge (who built Stanley’s hotel) for John Kinney whose daughter Ellen married Richard O’Connell fom Rock & Pillar (Jack & Jim’s brother) Google Steven Jaymes (note Jaymes spelt with a ‘y’) and enjoy his rendition of ‘Can’t remember to Forget’ and ‘Drift Away’ filmed in that old stone house that was once an O’Connell/Kinney residence. The artist’s actual name I believe is Steven Jaymes Kinney but believe he adjusted it for marketing reason. Steven’s Mum & Dad - Pat & Fleur Kinney are retired in Timaru. Does anyone have a memory of the O’Connell connection with that old stone house. Last time I was there I saw a table with Richard O’Connell’s name on it. Richard (Dick) died as he sang at a St. Patrick’s day concert at Rakaia and is burried with Ellen in the Hyde cemetery.
Seán O’Connell
Seán O’Connell
O’Connell and Dowlings? Looks like a wedding. Who’s that with the bouquet?
O’Connell and Dowlings.
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Maurice Prendergast I recognise the location by mix of the picket fence, the poplars, and the profile of the promontory in the background. The location is on the Northern side of Hyde on SH87 - outside the Dowling homestead (Hanover Farm) The very first Hyde school ( a corrugated building) is still standing just out of picture shot. There was a progression of Dowling girls who filled the role of Hyde Postmistress - many of them progressing from there to Holy orders. Surviving Dowling daughter Winifred (Winny) married Leo Kinney and lives in retirement in Chch. Can any of those in this photo be named?
Seán O’Connell
Seán O’Connell
Aunty Teresa (in back ground) Aunty Ceil, Uncle Mick, Mary, Francis, Anne & Ray.
Mick O’Connell and Ceil Callaghan’s wedding.
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Seán O’Connell Who’s Mary?
Kate O’Connell Mary Callaghan, Ceil’s sister.
Kate O’Connell I mean Grandma’s sister...who became just like a grandma to her great nieces and nephews given we never met Ceil. And not just because she had a big lolly jar when we were little, and when we got older, a bar in her and Frances’ living room.
Seán O’Connell
Sean O’Connell
Larhardan.
Lahardan.
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Maurice Prendergast Does anyone know who built this house? That is: who was the stone mason?
Denise O’Connell Could you tell me more about this home please?
Seán O’Connell All I know is that it is at Ngapuna, near Middlemarch, and it was named after the townland Ned was born in. Ned and Letty lived here for a time.
Denise O’Connell Thankyou I was thinking it was at Macraes
Maurice Prendergast No - it features in O’Connell history much earlier than any ‘O’Connell presence’ in Macraes. I believe that it was where Edward and Letitia O’Connell originally settled in Rock & Pillar (not Ngapuna). It was the ‘seeding property’ of the O’Connell dynasty in NZ. Sean called it Larharden. I had never seen it spelled that way, but I’ve variously seen it spelled Laharden. La Harden and L’arden. Sean is probably right in that it was named after the Property that Ned left in Ireland, but our folklore suggests that the name runs deeper than that. I always understood that it was named after the ‘snob’ finishing school that the earlier (male) O’Connell generations attended in France. While I understand that the children were raised to their fledgling years in this house, it was not their original residence. O’Connells bought that house from the Harvie family who then migrated to the Nenthorne Valley. This would account for earlier script about the O’Connells of Rock & Pillar referring to that property as L’arden. Rock & Pillar and Ngapuna were two separate settlements. My mother Sara Letitia (Edward and Letitia’s granddaughter) was raised at Ngapuna on a separate O’Connell property named Ballyhooly. I think we should all (in the interest of accuracy) stop this confusion between Rock & Pillar and Ngapuna. It really does matter - I’m sure for instance that a family with deep roots in (say Tinwald) would be really pissed off if in 100 year’s time, history was to show that their roots were in Ashburton - simply because somewhere along the line someone didn’t think it important to make the distinction. Five O’Connell sons were raised in that house and there is a longstanding light hearted joke that our Protestant friends used to mock us with, and it went like this. Of the five O’Connell brothers from L’arden, Jim moved to Macraes and prospered, Jack (my GF) went to Queenstown and went broke, Richard (Dick) went to Rakaia and died, Mick went to Dunedin and played billiards, and Dan joined the Priesthood and became a father! The question of who the stonemason was who built that house? I don’t know but (unreliable) folklore suggests it was one Jack Budge - the same mason who built Stanley’s Hotel in Macraes. He also built the stone house at the Fillyburn for John Kinney from Antrim Ireland - whose daughter Ellen married Dick O’Connell from Rock & Pillar; who purchased land at Rakaia where he died a sudden and untimely death while preparing to sing at the St Patrick’s concert. Anybody interested in seeing that stone house, should go to Google and type in Steven Jaymes. Steven Jaymes (spelled with a ‘Y’) is a Sydney artist who was originally Steven Jaymes Kinney. I believe he changed his name for marketing reasons. He brought his entire troupe from Sydney recently and did a ‘tribute to his roots’ in that old stone house that Dick O’Connell migrated from to Rakaia. It’s worth a look - look for a thumbnail depicting two white horses - I think ‘Drifting Away’ is one of the titles. Last time I was in that house I saw a kitchen table in storage with the inscription on the underside which read ’Richard O’Connell Rock & Pillar’ Some things do withstand the test of time eh?
Maurice Prendergast Sorry guys - Google Steven Jaymes (Jaymes with a ‘Y’) and look for the title ‘Can’t remember to forget’ That’s at least one of the numbers that he performs in Dick O’Connell’s stone house at the Fillyburn. It was actually a Kinney house and by some means (probably by marrying the daughter Ellen Kinney) Dick seemed to assume ownership. The artist Steven Jaymes is in fact Steven Jaymes Kinney from Hyde whose great grandmother (Johanna Prendrgast) was the sister of my grandfather Michael Prendergast. They migrated from County Clare to Hyde in the 1860’s.
Seán O’Connell Sorry. That should have been spelt Lahardan (no ‘r’). The original townland in Kerry where Ned was born is spelt Lahardane but pronounced without the ‘e’.
Seán O’Connell
Sean O’Connell
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Seán O’Connell The Mulcares are a branch of our Aussie cousins. Several of them were living around Greymouth at the time. Edward Mulcare was Richard’s 2nd cousin, once removed.
Trish Redwood Dad’s oldest brother.
Maurice Prendergast Yes - your Dad’s half brother and my Mum’s full brother. Our folklore is that Jack (Richard’s father) was so poor that he was unable to fund the travel to attend his son’s funeral. An obituary from the NZ Tablet that my Mum treasured made much of the story that O’Connell had insisted he swap shifts with a man with children on the grounds that the shaft was unsafe and that a married man with children should not be exposed to that danger. Reference also made to his commitment to the Church - his rosary beads having been found in his pocket when his body was recovered. Does anybody know of that obituary?
Seán O’Connell
Sean O’Connell
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Denise O’Connell Great photo..who and where?
Seán O’Connell It’s someone mustering on the Rock and Pillar range. I don’t know who but the photo is in dads collection and I presume it came from Granddad.
Jo O’Connell I dont think thats on the Rock and Pillars ,Sean, Looks like a site down the Deepdell creek on the Golden Point run.
Seán O’Connell Do you think the other mustering photos are from the Golden Point Run as well?
Jo O’Connell I cant tell on the others but I think I could find this site if it hasnt been destroyed by the mining.
Seán O’Connell
Seán O’Connell
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Maurice Prendergast I knew Ellie (always known to us as Aunty Nel. She was a devout Catholic. Lived her twilight years @ 23 Morninton Rd Dunedin. I boarded with her for 6 months towards the end of my schooling @ Christian Bros High School (now Kavanah College) She was the daughter of John Kinney of Fillyburn. The old stone Fillyburn house is preserved in pristine condition, and features in a beautiful ‘dedication to his roots’ by Sydney musian Stephen Jaymes Kinney (born to Pat & Fleur Kinny of Hyde). For marketing reasons Stephen dropped his surname and performs simply as Stephen Jaymes. Google him and rejoice in the splendour of his music at that old stone Fillyburn house where Ellie (above) was born. Be sure to spell Jaymes with a ‘y’.
Maurice Prendergast Further to my earlier comment, Ellie was a widow for (maybe) 30 years. Dick died very young before they had any children. He was one of 5 brothers raised at Rock & Pillar/Ngapuna amongst whom was Jim who migrated to Masraes, my GF John who migrated to Glenorchy then Frankton and finally back to Hyde where he was killed in train crash @ Hyde in 1943. Mick (married a callery) & went to Dunedin and legendry played billiard and of course Daniel (Fr Dan) who became a priest and served much of his time in Alexandra. Richard & Nel (above) migrated to Rakia where Richard died suddenly while preparing himself to sing at a St Patrick’s concert. They are buried in a double plot in the Hyde cemetery. This triggers another memory for me. The Hyde cemetery is notoriously rocky and we frequently had to use explosives to break through the rock seams. That was OK with a new plot where no existing grave was at risk, but Dick had been buried in a dedicated double plot and we had to dig Nel’s grave within the confies of that double plot so that we could park her next to Dick. Not surprisingly we struck basalt rock which defied all our efforts. My brother Dick (Prendergast) was considered the most experienced with explosives and it was he to whom the task fell to position and calculate the gelignite charge necessary to break through the rock without;
Seán O’Connell I’m waiting on tenterhooks to hear whether they blew Dick up or not.
Maurice Prendergast Sorry guys - hit the wrong key - was describing My brother Dick’s task in blasting through the rock for Nel’s grave without disturbing Dick - as it was close to 6 foot down and Dick was obviously nearby. The out come was a work of art - Richard remained undisturbed but I have an enduring memory of his exposed coffin which remained intact but the timber wall of his coffin had turned to a kind of parchment state - so thin that it ‘fluttered’ in the breeze. Richard died as he prepared to sing at a St. Patrick’s concert - which surprises me as I’m unaware that there was musical talent in that generation. Can anyone tell me? Obviusly - generations later music emerged (like Stephen Jaymes Kinney) late of Hyde and now of Sydney, but never heard of music in the Rock & Pillar generation.
Joe O’Connell Mick O’Connell who married the Callery and his sons, Tom and Jim, were all great singers as well as their progeny. Apparently Jim our grandfather could sing a bit but he married Ellen Claffy of whom my mother said, “she was the only woman in the world without a note of music. She never so much as hummed a tune around the house”.